Challenges of Glaucoma Management in Nigeria: a Nationwide Perspective

  • Fatai Olasunkanmi Olatunji Department of Ophthalmology, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
  • Abdulkabir Ayansiji Ayanniyi Department of Ophthalmology, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria
  • Bala Hassan Askira Department of Ophthalmology, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Nigeria
  • Ferdinand Chinedum Maduka-Okafor Department of Ophthalmology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria
  • Kareem Olatunbosun Musa Department of Ophthalmology, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos. Nigeria
  • Sadiat Eletu Saka Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Medical Centre, Birni Kebbi, Kebbi State, Nigeri
  • Auwalu Saminu Jibrin Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Medical Centre, Azare, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: Glaucoma blindness is burdensome. Knowing glaucoma management challenges can reduce glaucoma blindness burden.The aim of this study was to determine challenges of glaucoma management in Nigeria

Methods: A descriptive cross sectional survey of Eye Care Physicians (ECP) on challenges of glaucoma management in Nigeria.  

Results: One hundred and twenty three ECP, mean age 44, 56.1% males. Most (68.3%) always and 31.7% often manage glaucoma. Glaucoma features; most 98.4% affirm glaucoma deserves special consideration among eye conditions. Most (87.8%) at least agree glaucoma management is very challenging. Presentation and treatment affordability; most ECP at least agree: most patients present late (110, 89.4%), cannot afford standard investigations (87, 70.7%), cannot afford treatment 62.6%. However, most ECP at least disagree most patients readily access drugs through health insurance 83.7%.Preferred treatment; most ECP at least agree: most patients prefer medical treatment 91.9%. being comfortable managing glaucoma with drugs 66.7%, medical treatment being cost effective than trabeculectomy 82.9%, and being as comfortable performing trabeculectomy as with cataract surgery51.2%. Drugs Availability; most ECP at least agree: common anti-glaucoma drugs are readily available (112, 91.1%), and drugs are expensive for most patients (105, 85.4%). Equipment; many ECP at least disagree: there is functioning OCT to investigate glaucoma (76, 61.8%), there is fundal camera for optic disc photography (62, 50.4%).

Conclusions: Glaucoma management remains challenging especially late presentation, treatment non-affordability and inadequate resource for glaucoma care. Medical treatment is a preferred choice among patients. The need to improve uptake of surgical glaucoma services underscored.

Author Biographies

Fatai Olasunkanmi Olatunji, Department of Ophthalmology, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
Ophthalmology
Abdulkabir Ayansiji Ayanniyi, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria
Ophthalmology
Bala Hassan Askira, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Ophthalmology
Ferdinand Chinedum Maduka-Okafor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria
Ophthalmology
Kareem Olatunbosun Musa, Department of Ophthalmology, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos. Nigeria
Ophthalmology
Sadiat Eletu Saka, Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Medical Centre, Birni Kebbi, Kebbi State, Nigeri
Ophthalmology
Auwalu Saminu Jibrin, Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Medical Centre, Azare, Nigeria
Ophthalmology

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Published
2019-03-30
Section
Original Article