Prevalence and factors associated with needle-stick injuries and splash with blood and body fluids among healthcare workers in hospitals of Bale Zone, Southeast Ethiopia

  • Demisu Zenbaba Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital
  • Daniel Bogale Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital
  • Biniyam Sahiledengle Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital
  • Demelash Woldeyohannes Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital
  • Yohannes Tekalegn Madda Walbu University Goba Referral Hospital

Abstract

Background: Healthcare workers are contracting infection following accidental needle-stick injuries and splashes with blood and body fluids. In Ethiopia, occupational exposures are often under report and/or not reported at all in many healthcare facilities. This study aims to determine the prevalence and factors associated with needle-stick injuries and splashes with blood and body fluids among healthcare workers in hospitals of southeast Ethiopia.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 1 to March 10, 2018. A total of 404 healthcare workers were included using simple random sampling technique from five hospitals (one primary, three general and one referral hospital). Descriptive statistics were computed. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were carried out at 95% Confidence Interval (CI) to identify factors.

Results: A total 394 healthcare workers participated in the study. The life time needle stick injury prevalence was 61.2 % (95%CI: 56.1-66.0%) and the last one year prevalence was 38.3 % (95%CI: 33.8-43.1%). Life time and one year prevalence of blood or body fluids splash exposure were 60.2 % (95%CI: 55.6-64.7%) and 44.9% (95%CI: 39.8-50.0) respectively. Needle recapping (AOR= 2.25; 95%CI: 1.26-4.03) and working in surgical and medical wards (AOR=1.85; 95%CI: 1.06-3.21) were factors associated with needle-stick injury and body fluid splashes exposure respectively.

Conclusions: There was a high level of occupational exposures among healthcare workers. Health authorities need to formulate urgent strategies to promote safe practice and occupational safety protocols along with strict adherence to infection prevention principles. 

Keywords: Body fluids splash; Needle stick injures; Hospitals, Ethiopia 

Author Biographies

Demisu Zenbaba, Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital
Environmental Health Unit, MPH
Daniel Bogale, Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital

Department of Public Health, MPH

Biniyam Sahiledengle, Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital
Department of Public Health, MPH
Demelash Woldeyohannes, Madda Walabu University Goba Referral Hospital

Department of Public Health, MPH

Yohannes Tekalegn, Madda Walbu University Goba Referral Hospital

Department of Public Health, MPH

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Published
2019-12-30
Section
Original Article