PANCYTOPENIA IN PREGNANT MOTHERS FROM EASTERN SHOA ZONE OF ETHIOPIA

Authors

  • Sisay Teklu AAU
  • Amaha Gebre Medhin Addis Ababa University Mob:+251923814681
  • Alula Meressa Center for International Reproductive Health Training-Ethiopia
  • Buruhan Feki Addis Ababa University, School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Mob:+251911535312

Abstract

Abstract

Pregnancy is a state of high metabolic demand. Anemia and thrombocytopenia, commonly as a result of the normal dilutional effect of increased plasma volume during pregnancy, are frequently seen in pregnant women but are not severe enough to require intervention unless aggravated by deficiency of micronutrients. Nutritional deficiency related anemia is often seen in developing countries. In this study, we describe seven cases of severe thrombocytopenia, anemia and leukopenia (pancytopenia) from the same geographic locality and similar clinical presentation. The cases were referred to the Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH) for investigation and treatment. Potential causes, methods of prevention and treatment options are discussed along with relevant clinical and laboratory findings of the cases.

Key words: Pancytopenia, Pregnant mothers, East Shoa Zone

 

Author Biographies

Sisay Teklu, AAU

Associate Professor, Ob-Gy department, AAU

Amaha Gebre Medhin, Addis Ababa University Mob:+251923814681

Associate Professor of Hematology
Department of Internal Medicine

Alula Meressa, Center for International Reproductive Health Training-Ethiopia


MPH and Consultant

Buruhan Feki, Addis Ababa University, School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Mob:+251911535312

Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident

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Published

2016-06-30

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