LABOR, DELIVERY AND POSTPARTUM COMPLICATIONS IN NULLIPAROUS WOMEN WITH FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION ADMITTED TO KARAMARA HOSPITAL

Authors

  • Wondimu Gudu Karamara Regional Hospital/Jijiga University
  • Mutasim Abdulahi Karamara Regional Hospital/Jijiga University

Abstract

Objectives

To assess labor, delivery and postpartum complications in nulliparous women with FGM/C and evaluate the attitude of mothers towards  elimination of FGM.

Methods

A prospective hospital based study using structured questionnaire was conducted between January to March 2015 at Karamara hospital, Jijiga, Ethiopia. All nulliparous women admitted for labor and delivery were included. Data were collected regarding circumcision status, events of labor, delivery; postpartum and neonatal outcomes as well as attitude of mothers towards elimination of FGM/C. 

Results

Two hundred sixty four (92.0%) of the women had FGM/C with most (93.0%) undergoing Type III FGM.  The mean age of the women was 22 yr. Failure to progress in 1st stage and prolonged 2nd stage of labor occurred in 165 (57.0%) and189 (65.6%) of the cases respectively. Caesarean section was performed in 17.0% and instrumental delivery in 23.0%. 64.5% required episiotomies, 83.3% had an anterior episiotomy, 29 % had perineal tears, 25.7%% experienced post-partum hemorrhage and 24% postpartum infection. Among the newborns, there were 6.4% perinatal deaths; 18.8 % low birth weight and 1.5% birth injuries. Almost all complications were more frequently seen in circumcised compared to non-circumcised women.  

Conclusions: The prevalence of FGM is high and it substantially increases the risk of many maternal complications. Health professionals should be aware of these complications and support/care of women with FGM should be integrated at all levels of reproductive health care provision. Capacity building of responsible health professional should be initiated in the area with intensification of FGM eradication activities.  

Author Biographies

Wondimu Gudu, Karamara Regional Hospital/Jijiga University

Gynecologist and Obstetrician at Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Karamara Regional Hospital

Mutasim Abdulahi, Karamara Regional Hospital/Jijiga University

Gynecologist and Obstetrician at Departement of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Karamara regional Hospital

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Published

2016-12-19

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Original Article